1950 Ladies Jacket Dress

1950 Ladies Jacket Dress

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Part Number:F0073

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This 1950 reproduction sewing pattern features a button-front jacket dress, darted at the neck and waist and seamed at center back.  Both long or 3/4 sleeves, cut in one with the bodice, are made with a gusset for ease in moving arms.  The rounded peplum extends just across the front to side-back seams.  The side drape in view 1 is attached at the right-side back seam.  The straight skirt has a concealed slide fastener under the fly front, two short darts in the back and side-back seams (no side seams).

SUGGESTED MATERIALS:    Silk Crepe, Rayon Crepe, Taffeta, Faille, Rayon Suiting, Light Wool
       
VIEW 1 WITH LONG SLEEVE OR 3/4 SLEEVES AND SKIRT DRAPE:

39 Inch Wide Material  -  Without  Nap                          5-1/2 Yards
42 Inch Wide Material  -  Without Nap                           4-7/8 Yards
39 Inch Stiff Taffeta for Lining and Interfacings            3/8 Yards

VIEW 2 WITH LONG OR 3/4 SLEEVES WITH OUT SKIRT DRAPE:

39 Inch Wide Material  -  Without Nap                     4-3/8 Yards
45 Inch Wide Material  -  Without Nap                     3-7/8 Yards
54 Inch Wide Material  -  Without Nap                     3 Yards
30 Inch Stiff Taffeta for Lining and Interfacings      1/2 Yards

ADDITIONAL NOTIONS

Tailor's Canvas for Interfacing of Peplum                1/2 Yards
Narrow Flat Hat Wire for Edge of Peplum              1 - Yards
1-inch Belting                                                         1 - Yards
Buttons, hooks and eyes, 7-inch zipper, snaps, seam binding for finishing, snaps for long sleeves, and optional hip pads for peplum, buckle or purchased belt.


For wonderful constructions details, check out the talented Laura's blog.




5 Stars
50s Drama
I have to admit that when I first fell in love with this design many years ago, I assumed it was a suit with a jacket and skirt. In fact, it is a dress with an ingenious front opening (hooray for new construction techniques!). The front bodice/peplum opens all the way to the side seams, independently of the skirt. To secure, the skirt is zipped and hooked at the center front, and after buttoning the bodice, it gets hooked into the skirt. This is so fabulous for getting ready – hair and makeup can be done before getting into the dress without any assistance! As far as drafting goes, the sleeves are ridiculously long – like, too long for Karlie Kloss. Interestingly enough, the elbow darts were almost perfectly placed for me, so I guess this was made for someone with really long forearms? But as far as issues go, it is a really simple one to fix! Because I knew before cutting into my final fabric that I was going to shorten the arms, I was able to cut the bodice back on the fold on my 56” wide fabric. This actually mirrors the skirt back which does not have a center back seam. Also, the hanging drape piece has a mitered cutout along the top edge which does not belong. It is also significantly longer than it appears in the illustration. If you want it to end at the skirt edge, you will most likely need to shorten it by a few inches or more. I shortened the piece by 3” and it turned out quite a bit longer than the skirt (which reminds me of a 1920s evening gown and I rather like the way it looks – but it is different than the picture). The bodice is quite a bit roomier than the sketch – the center back is gathered at the waist, almost creating a sack-back appearance. I took out some of the extra ease because I was using a sturdy fabric which did not want to gather very easily. The instructions reference millinery wire for the peplum edge – I wasn’t exactly sure how that would work (would it bend under a seat belt, for instance?) so I opted for horsehair braid instead. With the addition of hip pads it held up beautifully. There are a few fiddly bits like gussets and a whole lot of hand sewing, but everything fits together, which makes it a pleasure to construct. I love my finished outfit so much, I think I am going to have to make myself another (less formal) version at some point.
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Reviewed by:  from California. on 11/13/2013
5

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